Square Books

SQUARE BOOKS Oxford, Mississippi since 1979

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Taking Gifts from Square Books Into the Wider World | SQUARE BOOKS

Great graduation gift ideas from our owner, Richard Howorth.

Filed under gifts graduation richard howorth square books oxford mississippi one writers beginning eudora welty north toward home willie morris my two oxfords this is water david foster wallace the last lecture randy pausch young money kevin roose flash boys michael lewis lean in lean in for graduates sheryl sandberg you are not special david mccullough jr congratulations by the way george saunders the opposite of lonliness marina keegan

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Description

If you don’t have anything nice to say about motherhood, then… read this book. Robin O’Bryant offers a no holds barred look at the day to day life of being a mother to three, running a household and the everyday monotony of parenting. It’s not always pretty but it’s real. Whether she’s stuffing cabbage in her bra… dealing with defiant yet determined daughters… yelling at the F.B.I… or explaining the birds and the bees to her preschooler… you’re sure to find dozens of humorous and relatable situations. From the creator of Robin’s Chicks, one of the South’s most popular blogs on motherhood, misunderstandings and musings, comes a collection of essays that will not only make you laugh and cry, but realize that you’re not alone in your journey.Sit back and relax, pour yourself some “mommy juice,” throw a fresh diaper on your baby and deadbolt the bedroom door to keep your kids out… because once you start reading you’ll be too busy wiping away tears of laughter to wipe anybody’s butt.



About the Author
Robin O’Bryant is a writer and stay-at-home-mom to three daughters born within four years. She finally figured out where babies come from and got herself under control. Robin survives the hilarity of motherhood by making fun of herself in her self-syndicated humor column, Robin’s Chicks and on her blog by the same name. She tweets compulsively as @robinobryant and over shares daily on Facebook as Robin Wiley O’Bryant. Come point and laugh.

Description


If you don’t have anything nice to say about motherhood, then… read this book. Robin O’Bryant offers a no holds barred look at the day to day life of being a mother to three, running a household and the everyday monotony of parenting. It’s not always pretty but it’s real. Whether she’s stuffing cabbage in her bra… dealing with defiant yet determined daughters… yelling at the F.B.I… or explaining the birds and the bees to her preschooler… you’re sure to find dozens of humorous and relatable situations. From the creator of Robin’s Chicks, one of the South’s most popular blogs on motherhood, misunderstandings and musings, comes a collection of essays that will not only make you laugh and cry, but realize that you’re not alone in your journey.
Sit back and relax, pour yourself some “mommy juice,” throw a fresh diaper on your baby and deadbolt the bedroom door to keep your kids out… because once you start reading you’ll be too busy wiping away tears of laughter to wipe anybody’s butt.

About the Author


Robin O’Bryant is a writer and stay-at-home-mom to three daughters born within four years. She finally figured out where babies come from and got herself under control. Robin survives the hilarity of motherhood by making fun of herself in her self-syndicated humor column, Robin’s Chicks and on her blog by the same name. She tweets compulsively as @robinobryant and over shares daily on Facebook as Robin Wiley O’Bryant. Come point and laugh.

Filed under Square Books moms parenting oxford mississippi ketchup is a vegetable robins chicks

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Bill Cotter Interview from Shelf Awareness

BILL COTTER HERE TONIGHT ON THACKER MOUNTAIN RADIO
CALL 662.236.2262 OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.squarebooks.com
FOR SIGNED COPIES

Book Brahmin: Bill Cotter


photo: Leon Alesi

Bill Cotter is a rare book dealer in Austin, Tex. He was born in Dallas in 1964, and moved often before landing in Austin in 1997. He has spent a lot of time in psychiatric hospitals. He is the author of two works of fiction, Fever and the new The Parallel Apartments (McSweeney’s, February 11, 2014). His short stories have appeared in the Paris Review, McSweeney’s Quarterly, New Orleans Review and elsewhere. He won a Pushcart Prize for his essay “The Gentleman’s Library,” published in the Believer in June 2012. Cotter lives with the storyteller and performer Annie La Ganga.

On your nightstand now:

Dog of the South by Charles Portis, X’ed Out by Charles Burns, The Art Forger’s Handbook by Eric Hebborn.

Favorite book when you were a child:

Hergé’s The Calculus Affair. My family lived in Iran from ‘73-‘76, and some of the only English books for children available at the international bookstores in Teheran and Ahwaz were the anesthetic fairytales and tedious mystery-adventure stories of the beloved and dumbfoundingly productive Englishwoman, Enid Blyton. I read many, many of these, and shibboleths of a para-British literary upbringing still occur in my syntax and grammar. It was after I swore off my last Blyton—The Book of Brownies—that I discovered Tintin. Even now, re-readings of The Calculus Affair soothe, startle and inspire.

Your top five authors:

Nadine Gordimer, José Saramago, A.M. Homes, Montaigne, Larry McMurtry.

Book you’ve faked reading:

Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. I’ve tried reading this, I have, but there’s no greater readerly suppressant than a trilogy of flagstones that begins with the assumption that the reader has already worked his or her way through The Hobbit, another book I’ve lied about having read.


Book you’re an evangelist for:

The Oxford English Dictionary. Everyone should own or have access to this, either the shelf-splintering 20-volume edition (plus Additions, in three volumes), or the one-volume microprint edition (with flea-glass), or even the elegant online edition—the maturation, usage and meanings of 600,000 English words are nowhere more steeply examined than in this book, arguably mankind’s greatest scholarly achievement (excepting, maybe, China’s Yongle Encyclopedia). Just open it and start reading.

Book you’ve bought for the cover:

Pim and Francie by Al Columbia. I was attracted to the sinister ink-and-pencil, tape-masked cover drawing of two footloose, four-fingered cartoons that look to be on their way to inhabit somebody’s nightmare. Come to find out it’s worse than that. No graphic novel (nor any work of fiction, for that matter) has laid the creeping harrows on me like Pim and Francie did. The ruined landscape imagined by Columbia is verily Boschian in its horror, though even Bosch never rendered knives in such a ghastly manner.

Book that changed your life:

Montaigne’s Essays. An “essay,” as defined by high school English teachers everywhere, is a series of words organized to form a three- to five-page work of nonfiction in which the author’s chosen subject is analyzed, interpreted or guessed at; this work is often presented to an instructor in essay-writing not as a written piece with intrinsic literary merit, but as an assertion of the author’s understanding of and ability to commit an essay, which is then graded a C- and refunded to the author for revision. This process vests the high-school English student with a just loathing of essays, either the reading or the writing of them. Why I picked up Montaigne in my 30s I don’t remember, but essays like “On Solitude,” “How Our Mind Tangles Itself Up,” “On Drunkeness,” “On Books” and many others entirely subtracted my high-school notion of the genre, and in a way gave me permission to write.

Favorite line from a book:

"Come screeching up to the crosswalk, bucking and skidding with a bottle of rum in one hand and jamming the horn to drown out the music… glazed eyes insanely dilated behind tiny black, gold-rimmed greaser shades, screaming gibberish…, a genuinely dangerous drunk, reeking of ether and terminal psychosis."  —Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson

Book you most want to read again for the first time:

Blindness by José Saramago.

Books you wish you could unread and have back the hours lost on them:

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown; Ulysses by James Joyce; The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie; Star: A Novel by Pamela Anderson.

Filed under bill cotter shelf awareness the parallel apartments square books oxford mississippi mcsweeneys

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“Diabetes is hell!” says Capri Smith, struggling with the debilitating disease that struck her daughter Ciara at age nine. Angie Simonton felt that a monster attacked her family when Lily succumbed before she was two years old. An equestrian in college, Devon Wright feared stigma and tried to shield her disease from public view. Animal CSR Megan DeHaven and Manhattan businessman Tom Arsenault worried that they would die in their sleep. Tom came to know borough EMTs by name, because he blacked out so frequently. Sharon Stinson, married and in her twenties, thought she would die like Shelby in Steel Magnolias. Sharon and her husband made many 911 calls and visited the local ER so frequently that they felt they had practically paid for the hospital.
Sweet Ciara, little Lily, and the rest of the people in this book are all Type 1 Diabetics. Like three million other Americans they suffer from an incurable autoimmune disease that destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Sugar rides a rollercoaster in each diabetic’s blood stream, sending the body into a catastrophic state. Death casts its shadow over each of them.
All of the parents in this group, the around the clock caregivers for their children, have frantically administered Glucagon shots or force fed sugar drinks in desperate attempts to steady erratic blood sugar events. Like Capri Smith, all of them have gone on daredevil car rides to the ER, frantic to save their daughters’ lives.
Desperate, each one sought a diabetic alert dog from Wildrose Kennels. Known as DADs, these British Labradors use their keen sense of smell to notify the diabetic or the caregiver of low and high blood sugar levels, thereby allowing prompt corrections to avert the episode or lessen its severity. Each one of these diabetics and the other authors in this collection has experienced attacks that led to seizure, or coma, dangerously close to death. Each one attests that the dog is a true lifesaver—daily. Lifesaving Labradors explains how the dogs do it, and how they are used to change and save lives.
The stories in Lifesaving Labradors present an inside the family understanding of this grave disease and the life transforming abilities of these diabetic alert dogs. ***Author here tonight at 5 p.m. Call or click through to our website to order.

“Diabetes is hell!” says Capri Smith, struggling with the debilitating disease that struck her daughter Ciara at age nine. Angie Simonton felt that a monster attacked her family when Lily succumbed before she was two years old. An equestrian in college, Devon Wright feared stigma and tried to shield her disease from public view. Animal CSR Megan DeHaven and Manhattan businessman Tom Arsenault worried that they would die in their sleep. Tom came to know borough EMTs by name, because he blacked out so frequently. Sharon Stinson, married and in her twenties, thought she would die like Shelby in Steel Magnolias. Sharon and her husband made many 911 calls and visited the local ER so frequently that they felt they had practically paid for the hospital.

Sweet Ciara, little Lily, and the rest of the people in this book are all Type 1 Diabetics. Like three million other Americans they suffer from an incurable autoimmune disease that destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Sugar rides a rollercoaster in each diabetic’s blood stream, sending the body into a catastrophic state. Death casts its shadow over each of them.

All of the parents in this group, the around the clock caregivers for their children, have frantically administered Glucagon shots or force fed sugar drinks in desperate attempts to steady erratic blood sugar events. Like Capri Smith, all of them have gone on daredevil car rides to the ER, frantic to save their daughters’ lives.

Desperate, each one sought a diabetic alert dog from Wildrose Kennels. Known as DADs, these British Labradors use their keen sense of smell to notify the diabetic or the caregiver of low and high blood sugar levels, thereby allowing prompt corrections to avert the episode or lessen its severity. Each one of these diabetics and the other authors in this collection has experienced attacks that led to seizure, or coma, dangerously close to death. Each one attests that the dog is a true lifesaver—daily. Lifesaving Labradors explains how the dogs do it, and how they are used to change and save lives.

The stories in Lifesaving Labradors present an inside the family understanding of this grave disease and the life transforming abilities of these diabetic alert dogs.

***Author here tonight at 5 p.m. Call or click through to our website to order.

Filed under diabetes square books oxford mississippi wildrose kennels labradors lifesaving alert